Thursday 1 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in B-flat major by Hugues

 from “30 Studies”

Today's piece is the fifth study from 30 Studi, Op. 32, by Italian flutist, composer and arranger Luigi Hugues.

Categories: Etudes Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Friday 2 October 2020

Tune of the Day: O'Brien's March

 Traditional Irish tune

This march appears in O'Farrell's Pocket Companion for the Irish or Union Pipes, Volume III, published in London 1808.

Categories: Marches Traditional/FolkDifficulty: easy
Saturday 3 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Allegro by Bellinzani

 from Recorder Sonata in G minor

This is the fourth and final movement of the fourth sonata from Sonate a flauto solo con cembalo, o violoncello (“Sonatas for solo flute with harpsichord or cello”) by Italian Baroque composer Paolo Benedetto Bellinzani, originally published in Venice in 1720.

This movement has actually no tempo indication in the original manuscript, but it usually appears as an “Allegro” in modern editions.

Categories: Baroque SonatasDifficulty: intermediate
Sunday 4 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Isabel

 arranged for two flutes

This was originally a song by English composer, conductor and arranger Sir Henry Bishop.

Wake dearest, wake! and again united,
We'll rove by yonder sea;
And where our first vows of love were plighted,
Our last farewell shall be:
There oft I've gaz'd on thy smiles delighted;
And there I'll part from thee,
Isabel! Isabel! Isabel!
One look, tho' that look is in sorrow;
Fare thee well, fare thee well, fare thee well!
Far hence I shall wander tomorrow:
Ah me! Ah me!

The present arrangement for two flutes is taken from Blake's Young Flutist's Magazine, published in Philadelphia in 1833.

Categories: BalladsDifficulty: intermediate
Monday 5 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in B-flat major by Prill

 from “24 Studies for the Development of Technique”

This étude in B-flat major is the nineteenth piece from 24 Etüden zur Förderung der Technik (24 Studies for the Development of Technique), Op. 12, by German flutist Emil Prill. It was first published in Bremen in 1913.

Categories: Etudes Written for FluteDifficulty: advanced
Tuesday 6 October 2020

Tune of the Day: The Hibernian Jig

 Traditional Irish tune

This tune appears in the fifth volume of James Aird's A Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs, first published in 1797. Although it is usually called a jig, tune collector Francis O'Neill (1922) remarked that “its emphatic swing and antique cadences proclaim this spirited strain a march”.

Categories: Jigs Marches Traditional/FolkDifficulty: easy
Wednesday 7 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Gnossienne No. 4

 by Erik Satie, arranged for flute and piano

Composed in 1891, Erik Satie's Gnossienne No. 4 for solo piano was only published in 1968. Like Gnossiennes Nos. 5 and 6, the piece was never called a “Gnossienne” by the composer himself, but was arranged and published as such by Robert Caby long after Satie's death.

Thanks to Paul Merkus for contributing this arrangement for flute and piano!

Categories: 20th centuryDifficulty: intermediate
Thursday 8 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Duet in A major by Berbiguier

 from “36 Petits Duos Mélodiques Faciles et Chantants”

This piece is the twenty-seventh duet from Trente-six Petits Duos Mélodiques Faciles et Chantants pour deux Flûtes (36 Easy Flute Duets) by French Romantic composer Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier.

Categories: Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Friday 9 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in C major by Hugues

 from “30 Studies”

Today's piece is the eighth study from 30 Studi, Op. 32, by Italian flutist, composer and arranger Luigi Hugues.

Categories: Etudes Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Saturday 10 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Wat zalmen op den Avond doen

 by Jacob van Eyck

This tune and its accompanying variations are taken from Der Fluyten Lust-Hof (“The Flute's Pleasure Garden”), a collection of music for recorder by Jacob van Eyck, one of the best-known Dutch musicians of the 17th century. First published in 1644, it is the largest collection of music for a single wind instrument ever published by a single composer.

“Wat zal men op den Avond doen” is usually translated as “What shall we do in the evening”, and is believed to have its origins in a German song of the same title.

Thanks to Phil for suggesting this tune!

Categories: Baroque VariationsDifficulty: intermediate
Sunday 11 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Adagio by Devienne

 from Flute Concerto No. 2 in D major

Today we propose the central movement of François Devienne's Flute Concerto No. 2 in D major, which was first published around 1790.

We have added a few phrases from the violin part to fill in the intro and a couple of measures where the flute rests.

Thanks to Felicity for requesting this piece!

Categories: Classical Concertos Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Monday 12 October 2020

Tune of the Day: O! Merry Row the Bonnie Bark

 arranged for two flutes

“O! Merry Row the Bonnie Bark” is an early-19th-century ballad by Welsh harpist and composer John Parry, based on an ancient Northumbrian melody. The present arrangement for two flutes is taken from Blake's Young Flutist's Magazine, published in Philadelphia in 1833.

Categories: Ballads Traditional/FolkDifficulty: easy
Tuesday 13 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in G minor by Prill

 from “24 Studies for the Development of Technique”

This étude in B-flat major is the twentieth piece from 24 Etüden zur Förderung der Technik (24 Studies for the Development of Technique), Op. 12, by German flutist Emil Prill. It was first published in Bremen in 1913.

Categories: Etudes Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Wednesday 14 October 2020

Tune of the Day: The Banks of Inverness

 Traditional Scottish/Irish tune

This melody is a popular polka in Ireland, but due to the word “Inverness” in the title it is thought to have Scottish origins (perhaps derived from a strathspey), and O'Farrell (c. 1806) gives the provenance as “Scotch”.

The tune is better known in Ireland under the title “The Croppies' March”. The term “Croppy” grew from the custom of the English and Scotch reformers in 1795, who cut their hair short. The same custom was adopted by the reformers in Ireland; and hence all those who wore their hair short were denominated “Croppies”, and were the marked objects of government vengeance. In truth, clipped hair constituted secondary evidence of treason, and was sufficient to cause the arrest and ill treatment of any person daring enough to adopt it.

Categories: Polkas Reels Strathspeys Traditional/FolkDifficulty: easy
Thursday 15 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Presto by Locatelli

 from Flute Sonata in B-flat major

This Presto is the third and final movement of the third of 12 sonatas for flute and continuo by Italian composer Pietro Antonio Locatelli, originally published in Amsterdam in 1732.

Categories: Baroque Sonatas Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Friday 16 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Duet in D minor by Berbiguier

 from “36 Petits Duos Mélodiques Faciles et Chantants”

This piece is the twenty-eighth duet from Trente-six Petits Duos Mélodiques Faciles et Chantants pour deux Flûtes (36 Easy Flute Duets) by French Romantic composer Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier.

Categories: Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Saturday 17 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in E-flat major by Hugues

 from “30 Studies”

Today's piece is the ninth study from 30 Studi, Op. 32, by Italian flutist, composer and arranger Luigi Hugues.

Categories: Etudes Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Sunday 18 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Port Gordon

 Traditional Scottish/Irish air

This harp air is said to have been composed for a Scottish patron by early 17th century Ulster-born harper Rory Dall O'Cahan, who traveled into Scotland and long played for the great families of that country. Recent research, however, raises the question whether he ever really existed.

The tune was reworked a century later by blind Irish harper Turlough O'Carolan (1670–1738) and later used for the Irish song “Maire beil ata h-Amnair”. Several early Scottish versions of the melody appear in the Balcarres Lute Manuscript, compiled in 1694. The present settings is taken from O'Farrell's Pocket Companion for the Irish or Union Pipes (1806).

Categories: Celtic Music Slow airs Traditional/FolkDifficulty: easy
Monday 19 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Gnossienne No. 5

 by Erik Satie, transcribed for flute and piano

Composed in 1889, Erik Satie's Gnossienne No. 5 for solo piano was only published in 1968. Like Gnossiennes Nos. 4 and 6, the piece was never called a “Gnossienne” by the composer himself, but was arranged and published as such by Robert Caby long after Satie's death. The piece is somewhat uncharacteristic of the other Gnossiennes not only in its upbeat style, rhythms and less exotic chordal structures, but also in its use of time signatures and bar divisions.

Thanks to Paul Merkus for contributing this transcription for flute and piano!

Categories: 20th centuryDifficulty: intermediate
Tuesday 20 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Kate Kearney

 arranged for two flutes

This arrangement for two flutes of the popular Irish tune “Kate Kearney” is taken from Blake's Young Flutist's Magazine, published in Philadelphia in 1833.

Categories: Celtic Music Traditional/Folk WaltzesDifficulty: easy
Wednesday 21 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in E-flat major by Prill

 from “24 Studies for the Development of Technique”

This étude in E-flat major is the twenty-first piece from 24 Etüden zur Förderung der Technik (24 Studies for the Development of Technique), Op. 12, by German flutist Emil Prill. It was first published in Bremen in 1913.

Categories: Etudes Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Thursday 22 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Long John's Wedding

 Traditional Irish tune

This jig is taken from Francis O'Neill's collection Music of Ireland, published in 1903. The oldest appearance of the tune is probably in the Patrick McDonald Collection of 1784, under the title “Posadh peathar In bhain” (“John Bain's Sister's Wedding”). The melody seems to be based on an old Scottish strain known as “My Home” (“Mo Dhachaidh”).

Scottish singer Belle Stewart's comic song “The Bonnie Wee Lassie frae Gourock” employs this tune, although it is an adaption of music hall star Harry Lauder's “Piper MacFarlane” (1906).

Categories: Celtic Music Jigs Marches Traditional/FolkDifficulty: easy
Friday 23 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Offertoire by Donjon

 for flute and piano

This beautiful piece was written by Romantic flutist and composer Johannes Donjon (1893–1912). It is a more advanced piece than Donjon's more famous “Pan”. The accompaniment was originally for harmonium, a small organ, but is usually played on piano these days.

Categories: Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Saturday 24 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Duet in G minor by Berbiguier

 from “36 Petits Duos Mélodiques Faciles et Chantants”

This piece is the twenty-ninth duet from Trente-six Petits Duos Mélodiques Faciles et Chantants pour deux Flûtes (36 Easy Flute Duets) by French Romantic composer Benoit Tranquille Berbiguier.

Categories: Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Sunday 25 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Study in F minor by Hugues

 from “30 Studies”

Today's piece is the tenth study from 30 Studi, Op. 32, by Italian flutist, composer and arranger Luigi Hugues.

Categories: Etudes Romantic Written for FluteDifficulty: intermediate
Monday 26 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Engels Nachtegaeltje

 by Jacob van Eyck

This tune and its accompanying variations are taken from Der Fluyten Lust-Hof (“The Flute's Pleasure Garden”), a collection of music for recorder by Jacob van Eyck, one of the best-known Dutch musicians of the 17th century. First published in 1644, it is the largest collection of music for a single wind instrument ever published by a single composer.

“Engels Nachtegaeltje” translates as “English Nightingale”, and as the title implies it is an imitation of birdsong. It is an excellent piece to practice Baroque ornamentation.

Thanks to Heather for suggesting this tune!

Categories: Baroque VariationsDifficulty: intermediate
Tuesday 27 October 2020

Tune of the Day: Adagio by Corelli

 from Violin Sonata in F major, transcribed for flute and keyboard

This Adagio is the opening movement of Italian Baroque composer Arcangelo Corelli's Violin Sonata No. 4 in F major, which was originally published in 1700 as part of his 12 Violin Sonatas, Op. 5. As conductor Andrew Manze put it, this is “arguably the finest and most influential set of violin sonatas ever assembled. All other baroque sonatas can be defined as being pre- or post-Corelli'”.

Thanks to Mary for suggesting this piece!

Categories: Baroque SonatasDifficulty: intermediate